How You Can Land a Job in a Different City

Katelyn Mashburn

As a recent Public Relations graduate from the University of Oregon, reluctant to settle into a job close to home, just yet, I was determined to secure my first job not only in a new city but a different country.  I chose to pursue a career in England, subsequently leading me to my 6-month position with Mulberry Marketing Communications in London. 

 Here are some tips to find a job in a new location.

Finding a job in any location requires conducting in-depth research, which allows you to understand the company’s work culture, philosophy, past work and current opportunities.  I stress the importance of applying for the appropriate job position by carefully reviewing the job specifications.  If your background doesn’t align with the qualifications then creatively state how your skills could contribute to the company’s goals. 

To look for job opportunities, I suggest setting up Google Alerts for job postings in the city where you want to work including industry key words. Twitter is another great tool to search for jobs as it provides instant access to job postings in specific cities.  You can subscribe to Twitter names or hashtags by regions, industry type, and companies that interest you.  A few examples are #tweetmyjobs, @Microjobs, @socialmediajobs, and @media_pros.  For more in-depth lists visit this Mashable post. 

After researching a few potential cities and companies, begin networking by utilizing social media networks.  I recommend using social media in two ways: creating content and connecting with others.

By creating content you will heighten your SEO, gain industry respect, and provide an example of your work.  Blogging remains a popular way to voice your industry expertise. Other favorites include: Slideshare, Scribd, Flickr, and YouTube.  Graeme Anthony stands out as an excellent example of a content creator.  Graeme recently relocated from Leeds to London by landing a job through an interactive video CV that he posted on YouTube.  The video went viral and he received numerous job offers in response. 

You can generate interaction through your published work, so begin connecting with others through social media platforms, such as LinkedIn, Slideshare, Twitter, blogs and much more.  This will demonstrate your enthusiasm for the industry while increasing your visibility to potential employers.

Once you’ve landed a job, it’s important to understand the logistics of moving and the living costs of the community.  Moving to London required a visa, and fortunately I qualified for the 6-month visa sponsored through BUNAC.  I highly recommend this program to find work abroad as a student and even post graduate.  Good luck with your job search and future endeavors. 

Katelyn Mashburn graduated with a public relations major from the University of Oregon in March 2010.  She recently returned from London where she worked as an account executive with Mulberry Marketing Communications on a 6-month contract.  Follow or contact her @Katelynmash.

3 comments on this post.
  1. Ben Cotton:

    Some excellent tips there Katelyn!

    I’ll be sharing this post more widely and no doubt following some of you advice myself.



  2. Job Option: Get Ahead by Going Abroad:

    […] provide insights into jobs from London to Japan, and I soon hope to enlist a first-person post from a former colleague who recently moved […]

  3. Talal Mulla Ali:

    2) Your tips are very helpful. It is true you should do in-depth research to increase your opportunity to get a job. I am not an American citizen, but I thought it would be easier to get a job in the United States until now. When it comes to reality, I realize that to work anywhere outside of the university, it is necessary to have social security number—which I do not have. However, my experience using social media should assist me in finding employment regardless of the location.

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