Thrive in PR Through Hard Work

   Bob Kornecki 

There’s been so much talk lately about finding a job, the question is:  What do you do to keep a job after you’ve worked so hard to land one?

My first boss at Burson-Marsteller told me that one of the surest ways to get ahead is to work harder than your peers.  “Come in an hour earlier to get a head start on the day, and work an hour later, and you’ll be just fine,” he said.

If I had been a cynic, I might have scoffed at the idea.  Surely, his advice was purely meant to increase my billability every week.  What about my work-life balance?  Wasn’t I supposed to be working smarter not harder?  The concepts weren’t even invented back then.

I simply appreciated having a job at a respected firm following graduation, respected my boss’ advice, and followed it almost subconsciously throughout my career.

Clearly there are many other ways to impress the boss and to thrive in the public relations business, but most successful people will tell you that there is no real substitute for hard work.

Bob Kornecki spent 35 years in the public relations agency business with Burson-Marsteller and Edelman. His book on How to Thrive in the Public Relations Business – 35 Tips from a 35-Year Veteranis available on Amazon.com and recently was published on Kindle.  He currently teaches public relations and organizational communication at DePaul and Loyola. 

2 comments on this post.
  1. Mark Dawson:

    The problem is you get the reputation for hard work, it is then expected of you and you get the dirty jobs no one else wants. It is who you know rather than who you are. Hard workers are often taken advantage of while others, your managers, team leaders etc or co workers claim the credit for your performance. Do you w0rk but also ensure others are doing their share and not brown nose managers to be placed above you by being seen as strategic thinkers rather than just workers grinding out material..

  2. Bob Kornecki:

    Mark — You must have had a bad experience somewhere along the line. That’s unfortunate.

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