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Add Social Media to Your Event Networking Strategy

October 10th, 2014 · 4 Comments

Ryan Baum

Ryan Baum

PRSSA 2014 National Conference has finally arrived, and many students are brainstorming ways to maximize their weekend in D.C. With an intentional approach to networking, attendees can build valuable relationships that last long beyond the closing ceremony. 

Strategic networking can lead to mentorship opportunities, internships, and, in my case, even a guest blog post on Culpwrit. 

It is important to practice smart networking during any meetings with potential connections, but, in this day and age, any professional repertoire is incomplete without a social media component.  

Social networking can be used to set the scene for in-person meetings and to sustain newly formed relationships once everybody returns home. It’s also a great way for students not at the conference to stay connected and engage with attendees. 

The advice in this post can be applied to large gatherings like National Conference or on a smaller scale with professionals that visit your PRSSA chapter. Here are my tips for success: 

Brace for Failure  

Before you start reaching out to new contacts, it’s important to prepare yourself for silence. 

Most of the time, even when you are doing everything right, you won’t hear anything back from the professionals you reach out to. Try not to take it personally, and keep at it — it will all feel worth it when you finally get a response from a popular speaker or industry leader. 

Culpwrit owner Ron Culp, providing perspective from the other side of the aisle, explained that industry-standard long weeks can make it difficult for professionals to interact. “There simply isn’t enough time in the day,” he said, “even for those of us who are inclined to respond to everyone.”  

Plan Ahead 

Start by researching the event speakers, and, more importantly, their topics.  

Try to find personal connections with your target contacts, like something distinctive you share in common. Bring it up when you talk during the event, and then mention it when you follow up to jog the professional’s memory. 

In that vein, narrow down your pool of potential contacts at larger events to focus on a handful of authentic interactions instead of an abundance of shallow small talk. 

Attend sessions and workshops prepared with the Twitter handles of the speakers and some background information, which can be gleaned from their Twitter history and a quick Google search. By understanding what each speaker cares about, and why, you can engage in a more meaningful way. 

You can also set yourself apart by starting in the days leading up to the event and tweeting to speakers about how excited you are for their presentations. Again, authenticity is key, so utilize your research and include one specific aspect of their topic that you are particularly looking forward to.

Provide Value

Students often have more to gain from professional relationships, but that doesn’t mean it has to be a one-way street. Figure out what you can bring to the table to show that you care about the other person beyond what they can provide you. Use what you learned in your research to determine what needs your new connection has and think about how you can help. 

This could be as simple as tweeting an insightful article related to a speaker’s discussion point during her workshop or even recommending a restaurant if a professional travels to an event in your town. 

I have personally had success with live-tweeting speakers at the UF PRSSA chapter and creating Storify event recaps afterward. Here is an example I made after Golin CEO Fred Cook spoke to our chapter last month.  

This technique works because you are engaging with the speaker (and other attendees), sharing the content with a larger audience and preserving the presentation for posterity — all benefits for the speaker. Also, any engagement will help professionals remember you when you follow up. 

Continue the Conversation

Face time at the event is important, but relationships form over time, not through a quick handshake. 

As you process National Conference and assess all of your new connections, follow up by requesting to connect on LinkedIn and make sure that you personalize the message. Include something distinctive that you talked about to recall his memories of the conversation. I also like to include one specific idea from the presentation that resonated with me, and how I plan to apply it to my life or professional career. That means a lot more than saying “nice presentation.” 

In the case of a multi-day conference, you can also use social media to follow up before you leave the event. My university hosted the first frank gathering last year and one of the speakers was Jenifer Willig, who led the charge on the international (RED) campaign. Adara Ney, 2013–2014 UF PRSSA president, reached out to her on Twitter after her presentation, and they ended up having coffee the next morning before Willig flew home.  

In the weeks following the event, continue the conversation by occasionally reaching out and staying on the professionals’ radar. Like and retweet their content that you enjoy and share your own relevant articles and information with them when appropriate. You can also reach out via email for a more personal discussion. Just be careful that you don’t overdo it; it rarely helps to come off as overeager.

Ryan Baum is a junior at the Univrsity of Florida. Active in numerous campus organizations, including PRSSA and student government, Ryan is assistant to the executive director of “The Agency,” the new, for-profit integrated marketing communications agency within the College of Journalism and Communications which will launch in spring 2015.

Tags: Future Leaders · Guest Post

4 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Dr. Kathleen Kelly // Oct 10, 2014 at 8:32 pm

    Well done, Ryan! Excellent advice.

  • 2 Ryan Baum // Oct 10, 2014 at 8:42 pm

    Thanks Dr. Kelly! I almost cited you when I wrote about continuing the conversation and continuously providing value — prime example of stewardship at work!

  • 3 Paul Swiergosz // Oct 11, 2014 at 6:50 am

    Ryan,
    Very well put. It was no accident Ron asked you to author this post.

    Had your baby-faced photo and bio not ID’d you as a college student I would have thought this blog written by someone with many more years of experience under their belt.

    Your powers of observation, patience and professionalism will pay you rich dividends in the years to come. Best of luck!

  • 4 Ryan Baum // Oct 11, 2014 at 1:15 pm

    Thank you so much for your kind words, Paul.

    Being mistaken for somebody older and more experienced is my favorite compliment. I’m glad that my words support that claim when my baby face betrays me!

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