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7 Factors Defining the Right Job For You

February 7th, 2014 · 11 Comments

Kevin Donnellon

Kevin Donnellon

My brilliant niece Kelly was considering a summer internship offer. She is a chemical engineering major who has been offered a position with a prestigious conglomerate.

I was helping my talented sister Mary evaluate this opportunity. And I suggested that these seven factors might define if a job is right for you:

  1. Reputation – is the company known for quality products and services, innovation and for being a good corporate citizen with healthy financials?
  2. Responsibilities – does it have experience and a track record in helping employees and teams to develop their asset of expertise, skills and capabilities? Will the company and its managers move you beyond your comfort zone?
  3. Leadership – do its managers take you and the organization to greater heights and challenge and inspire you to be the best you can be while being ethical, fair and accountable?
  4. Location – is the company located where you can enjoy living and that offers things that embody your personal activities and hobbies?  I always tell athletes to pick a college for reasons besides playing their sport as injuries or other issues might preempt their athletic career.
  5. Relationships – will you build your quality network of peers for assistance now as well as potential partners for future collaborations and opportunities? My Procter & Gamble and Wilson Sporting Goods Co. and agency and clients networks are invaluable to me.
  6. Friendliness – yes, being collaborative and inspirational are important but does a company care about you as a person as much as a professional? Will it help you grow and will it make your experience fulfilling?
  7. Money and benefits – are you being compensated based on your competencies and character, as well as the market for your expertise, experience and successes?

It’s no coincidence that money and benefits are the final factor. If all other factors are present, this will take care of itself. You will be fulfilled, content and inspired and do great work and make a rewarding salary.

Now, will you get all of these elements in any job? Maybe, but you can evaluate which ones are the most important for you, and then you will me a smart values-based decision.

It’s interesting to note that these factors constitute an effective system for evaluating not only a job but any business relationship.

What other factors would you consider valuable in your job and relationship evaluation?

Kevin Donnellon is marketing public relations profession who works with sports, health and fitness and consumer packaged goods’ companies and brands. He has worked for the world’s most premier brands and most exciting start-ups on a number of award-winning campaigns.

Tags: Advice from a Pro · Guest Post · Job Search

11 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Jenna Wehner // Feb 9, 2014 at 10:56 am

    Hi Kevin,
    My name is Jenna Wehner, and I am a student at Southeast Missouri State University. I would enjoy working for a non profit, and the factors you listed above I feel would be met. Only concern is the opportunity for potential growth within the business/organization. Do you think this is a valuable factor that should be taken into consideration?

  • 2 Riley Hale // Feb 9, 2014 at 8:55 pm

    Kevin,
    I would have never thought that “reputation” would help me define a good job for oneself, but it’s entirely true. Your reputation builds off the company you grow with, and eventually correlates. Have you considered that friendship would be a good subject for defining the right job?

  • 3 Amy Swartzbaugh // Feb 9, 2014 at 11:00 pm

    Kevin,
    In my job evaluation I look for what I value. I don’t just think about if I am the right fit for the company, but also if the company is the right fit for me.

  • 4 Kevin Donnellon // Feb 10, 2014 at 10:07 am

    Hi Jenna, absolutely growth and opportunity are important factors. I will include this in an update of my post in the future. Great thought. Thanks, Kevin

  • 5 Kevin Donnellon // Feb 10, 2014 at 10:08 am

    Hi Riley, thanks for your thoughts. Smart thoughts on reputation. Original post include friendliness and relationships. Were you thinking of something specific that is different?

  • 6 Kevin Donnellon // Feb 10, 2014 at 10:10 am

    Hi Amy, what do you value? Right fit is essential on both sides of the decision process. And as you suggest I would emphasize your fit as much as their fit. Love to hear your values. Thanks, Kevin

  • 7 Tim Randell // Feb 10, 2014 at 7:38 pm

    Hello Kevin,
    I really enjoyed reading your blog. I am about to graduate and enter the working world. This post really gave me a few quality thoughts to ponder before accepting a possible job offer. I do have a question about your comment on responsibilities. When you asked if the employer moves you beyond your comfort zone. Did you mean your ethical comfort zone, as in doing the right thing? Or being pushed beyond what you know to increase ones own potential? I believe that we must be pushed slightly past what we are comfortable with to reach our full potential as an employee, but also as a person.

  • 8 Tim Randell // Feb 10, 2014 at 7:39 pm

    Hello Kevin, I really enjoyed reading your blog. I am about to graduate and enter the working world. This post really gave me a few quality thoughts to ponder before accepting a possible job offer. I do have a question about your comment on responsibilities. When you asked if the employer moves you beyond your comfort zone. Did you mean your ethical comfort zone, as in doing the right thing? Or being pushed beyond what you know to increase ones own potential? I believe that we must be pushed slightly past what we are comfortable with to reach our full potential as an employee, but also as a person.

  • 9 Kevin Donnellon // Feb 11, 2014 at 9:19 am

    Hi Tim, beyond your comfort zone of your capabilities so you are always learning. Never compromise your ethics. Make sense? Thanks for your question.

  • 10 Amy Swartzbaugh // Feb 13, 2014 at 7:44 pm

    Kevin,
    What I value most is accountability. Especially in an industry where deadlines are so important. I also value humility. No matter how high a position one holds in an organization, company, or group if they always remember the lowest people it will get them a lot of respect!

  • 11 Julia Miesner // Feb 19, 2014 at 8:08 am

    Kevin, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this article! It is great to hear someone successful talk about motivating factors other than salary. In my job right now, I feel I have enough of all of these factors. However, this is not a job I want to stay at for the rest of my life because of the limitations on responsibilities, salary, and location. I would love to stay with this company, but I want to hold a different position. How can I reach out to them without seeming too eager or pushy?

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